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unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
in the fields of engineering, science, and math -- you dig, the numbers are fairly is stunning. -- fairly stunning. roughly 44% of graduates are in those skills. europe is at 24%. i say this respectfully, and i know we are on c-span. when the your pants -- the europeans are outpacing us, in these key fields that will drive innovation, then you know we are in trouble. i would correct one comment. there have been at some of us, chris coons and marco rubio, we have put forward legislation long before the election that said, let's look at this talent competition issue. let's put forward an approach that many of us, those of us that have been from the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science and engineering or math graduates, native-born americans, particularly focusing on losing the numbers in middle school where girls and children of college had enormous challenges, that is something we will have to come back to. we also have to continue to attract talent from around the world. one of the ways tha
? >> thanks, jess. >>> learning what science tastes like. >> chemistry in the kitchen, you bet. cool schools is coming up next. >>> howard here with your weather first. you'll need the heavy coats. down to the 20s in a few spots. it will be a sharply colder day, sunny with a few afternoon clouds here and there. lunch time temperature of 43. we'll only top out in the mid- 40s. i'll be back with a warmer weekend forecast in just a few minutes. >>> owward on the northbound side of 395, we've been telling you about an accident sitting on the shoulder north of duke street but before seminary road. more equipment has arrived on the scene. now original the two left lanes get through. expect delays as you come up from springfield. coming up in my next report, i'll also explain a situation going on in bethesda on the beltway at 6:18. back to you guys. >>> thursday morning cool schools time is here. we this morning are learning what science tastes like. the students in d.c. did their lab work on location. they went to a place where molecules and a master chef made for a tasty lesson. >> reporter: love
is what about the science shows it is. but he's doing this interesting thing where he's claiming to say the same thing that obama said about this. what obama was asked about was how do you explain to your daughters that you know, you're a christian. christianity said it took six days for the earth to be created. how do you explain that to your daughters. obama went on a theological question, we don't know how long six days is. i believe in the science obama has said millions of times, we should teach geology and evolution in science class and if you want to teach intelligent design and other theories, do it in religion class. and the important part with rubio is while he does seem to be tempering his first line now with mike allen yesterday after he got a lot of criticism for it he still believes fundamentally that you should teach creationism alongside evolution in classes. that's really where this comes from. his history when he was in florida as a state house speaker was a huge fight over evolution education in
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement can be reached, but again drew a hard line for republicans in congress. >> everybody's is going to have
out? a new report by the national academy of science says the agency has no solid plan for the future. that report blames the president for the lack of direction, but it goes on to say nasa has not done enough to accomplish the obama administration's goal of sending astronauts to an astroid. a former nasa scientist says he's never seen the agency so utterly unfocused. >>> the holidays are finally here and one of the fixtures of the season happens tomorrow night. erica grow with a preview of the lighting of the national christmas tree. >> the first lady and tree will be where? >> reporter: the national park foundation is ready to give you a tree lighting ceremony you won't soon forget. the national tree is brand-new just planted in october and it's been prepped for tomorrow's spectacular display from top to bottom. >> we work on it all year long and now is crunch time. this is the 90th anniversary of the tree lighting. we'll have over 20,000 people here tomorrow night watching a live show. >> and the first lady of the united states of america. >> reporter: the stage is set for a spec
. they produce products that and for public opinion, she policies, and advanced science, engineering, and madison. that question is complicated, and nrc leaders put together a panel of people that represented a broad range of disciplines. they convene the leaders from business and industry, academy, and government and the national laboratories. i had the privilege of being a member of that panel. because congress asked for 10 actions that to be taken to shore up universities, restructured our report around 10 recommendations with a time frame of the next 5-10 years. one recommendation focused on policies affecting the flow of international scholars and students to the u.s. more and more international students are inclined to come to our research universities. uva has had a 60% increase in such applications in the last three years alone. that has been fueled largely by applications from chinese students. the u.s. benefits when talented students and faculty come to the country to study and conduct research. the benefit even more if they stay in the u.s. to work after they graduate. it is in our nat
. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they have led to charges that that anger the democratic base. will that be the basis of your message to unseating some of those governors? >> here is the state that produces the automobiles for america that with out pres
of our own problem getting our own students excited in science and engineering. if we could cut the atransition rate of students in science and engineering, we could meet many of our need in the united states for stem workers. so i think it's important that we have the trust if we address the high skilled immigration issue, we don't do that as a substitute for looking at all these other issue that is still need work. your question ends up being do i trust that congress will do something and track vord not too good. >> one thing i want to say in response to senator warner who i agree with almost all the time which he said the election was a size mick shift. i think it's important that both sides don't overplay their hand. i understand the democratic side of president obama winning reelection and by a pretty significant electoral margin. it also was clear if you looked at the data that the reason for that predominantly was the latino vote. indeed one statistic if mitt romney had gotten the same percentage of latino vote george w. bush got he probably would have won. you have to ge
of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment. and these individuals and organization form the ideas that frame the debate that goes on both in the legal arena and in the political arena over t
. we don't see science of positive returns until 40 days. that's two months from now wekds positive returns on average. i think we have lower to go here. >> actually, i think you have fairly good seasonal strength in december and january through iphone sales. i think that's run with of the big catalysts for the company. you've got this product. you recently signed an agreement with sprint. you have t-mobile coming in next year. you have the carriers lining up and starting to sign. only two years ago you had one carrier, at&t. now you have four coming up. because it's been in decline so much, this is a good time to, you know, buy. maybe get a couple dollars cheaper. >> good conversation, guys. you both made good cases right now on a stock that everybody is watching these days. thanks for joining us. appreciate it very much. >> thank you. >> okay. we're in countdown mode. about half an hour away before we close up for the trading week. we're still holding on the dow. it's up about 52 points right now. the nasdaq is still dragging its feet compared to the other two indices. >>> and the
, this is not hard. this ain't rocket science. it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision was made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent middle class tax cuts. the president would probably have me sprint up to the hill to bring the bill down for him to sign. it can be done like that. it is not complicated. >> the president and the democrats have the poll numbers on their side. 53% of people approve of the job president obama is doing. 53% trust him to handle the negotiations while just 36% say they trust the republicans in congress. and 65% of voters are with the president on a sticking issue in these negotiations -- raising taxes on household income over 250,000. 31% oppose it. and today a new number is strengthening the president's position in the negotiations. the november jobs report shows the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7%. the economy added 146,000 jobs last month, and that is one reason why today john boehner kind of, sort of maybe entertained the idea of giving president obama what he wants on tax rates, at least rhetorically. >> even if the presiden
ahead. >> reporter: this political science professor at uw called this an interesting bind for the president, saying my crens is they will look the other way, but find a couple high profile people who are well beyond the bounds of our new law and bust them, but leave everyone else completely alone. if that happens, the target could be on frank snarr, but he thinks he's just the first and more private smoking rooms will soon pop up. >> and more power to them. if they can raise revenue for the state, that's what it's all about. that's what we're in business for. >> now, the bar owner stresses the buying or selling of marijuana inside his club is strictly prohibited. >>> well, still ahead this morning, as fighting continues in syria, a new move by rebel forces to improve coordination could bring on support from the united states. >> and in london, more backlash over the death of a nurse who fell victim to a radio show prank. find out what people are saying the radio host should do now. we'll be right back. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all.
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ >> greg: last week, i went on a tour to promote my book "the joy of hate" which took me from florida, to alabama, and georgia. to tennessee. some call this the south with sarcasm. a buddy of mine gave me flick "deliverance" to watch as a joke. but i freaked out, large crowds with mom for daughters and sons for dads. dads for daughters. so many brought food from pumpkin bread to moonshine. that nearly killed me. more unicorns to shake a horn at. each place i went fan of the five turned on by a parent or their child. this was shared activity, the "the five," "red eye requests ants fnc, key place for families to commiserate. most is over their hatred of jasper. that makes them intelligent. but something is going on here. you fair food and everything. a stranger offered to take our orders and never heard or seen from again. new yorkers will mock this. the stupid rubs. but this is the only culture we have left as we barrel down identity politics and victim measure victor. only place left that everyone is the same is here. as
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> you're watching cnbc's "squawk on the street" live from the financial capital of the world. the opening bell set to ring in just under two minutes or so. if you want to play the history game looking at the history of the month of december for the markets, some call it meaningless but it is basically the second best month of the year after april. 23 of the past 28 decembers have been up. average of 1.5%. since '90, up 2%. not an insignificant -- santa claus is for real many times. >> many of us have to commit. we're not allowed to own individual stocks but it's uniform gift to minors time. you have to make a contribution. i don't know whether you guys do it. it's a great way to put money away for your kids. that contribution is due now. there are a lot of contributions that are due that you remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to co
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> the headlines on friday looked great. unemployment rate drops to 7.7%. 146,000 americans score new jobs, but those headlines don't tell the whole story. christine romans is here to share the breakdown of that report. >> let's go beyond the headline and look deep inside these numbers at say the unemployment rate. the underemployment rate. 41.1% of people out of work have been out of work for six months or longer. that starts to become a real big problem for the economy when these people are left behind. underemployment still high. 14.4%. some call this the real unemployment rate. it's almost double what that headline number is. another big problem. let's look in the sectors that are hiring. retail jobs. 53,000. all of those retailers hiring up for the holiday season, but many of those jobs are temporary and it's kind of hard to send a kid to college on the -- many of those retail jobs and there aren't always benefits. some place where they are benefits if you look into these numbers, you can see tha
by the national academy of sciences. the report blames the president for a lack of direction. it also says nasa has not done enough to accomplish the obama administration's goal of sending astronauts to an asteroid. >>> the first female submariners in the u.s. navy have earned their dolphin. the dolphin pins awarded wednesday signify a woman's status as fully qualified submarine officers. they underwent a year of training followed by a year at sea to reach the milestone. >>> what was planned as a birthday party for jazz legend dave brubeck is now becoming a memorial tribute. >> he died just one day shy ever his 92nd birthday. his passion reached so far, it influenced the causes of civil rights and the thawing of the cold war. >> reporter: dave brubeck was a jazz pioneer whose career spanned eight decades. a classically trained pianist and composer formed his first band in 1951. eight years later the album "time-out." made his name a household name. it included a composition his saxophonist paul desmond wrote. "take five" with its catchy rhythms and unusual beat became brubeck's signature. it wa
tara wall was a senior media adviser for. an associate professor of science at columbia university. a fellow at the roosevelt institute and manuel reyes. thanks for having you here. it's nice to have you. >>> tara, welcome to nerdland. >> how did i know you were coming to me first. >> now i would like you to explain your party. >> lay it all on the table. >> in a certain way, it's so early, i feel silly talking about it. but i do think it's important that we not sort of come out of a win as i've seen both parties do in midterm elections or general elections with this narrative, oh, the other party is over. this is the decisive election. i don't think we see anything like that. when you look at the new herd, what seems to you like the things that are different? >> i think, number one, there are a couple of things. i think as you mentioned, it is a little more diverse, both ethnically and sexwise. i mean, you have a few more women which i think is great. i think after any election, everybody does recalibrating and lessons learned. i think what you don't want to lose sight of is the f
that the science is unequivocal on this. that repeated hits to the head. not just concussions by the way but routine hits to the head that football players take often lead far more than in the general lop legs lead to depression, the early on set of ghen sharks alzheimer's and even lou gehrig's disease there no question about that who would deny that it's the roughest game in the world maybe with the exception of rugby and if you are going to play it it, you are taking a bodily risk. everyone knows that. >> absolutely. >> you are richly rewarded if you succeed. and then there are guys like my friend frank gifford who played many many years, got a bunch of concussions but, you know, he is now an elderly man but is he still in good shape. so it's not a cause and effect, this is absolutely going to happen. but the culture of pro-football now is so intense and these guys take a lot of substance, whether they admit it or not, painkillers, just to build your body up and all of that. that i'm just wondering whether this is a really now off the chart high risk group for the madness exon inept. >
has fallen dramatically. there is no scientific relation in social science between the number of guns and the homicide rate. we've seen, there is just -- >> what a load of absolute -- >> -- virginia has gone up dramatically. >> what a load of claptrap. >> we have to be clear about this. he's talking about virginia. the death rate in virginia has gone up and i think people don't understand all that. in the united states, we have some agreement on what we can do and i think we need to talk about that. there's some new polling by mayors against illegal guns that show that huge majorities of gun owners and americans believe that we should have background checks on all gun sales and let me tell you, states that do that save lives. and we need to do the things i think that are possible, the things that are going to make a big difference. we know that in america, if we do things like background checks on things like better tools for psychiatrists, we can stop these killings. not all of them, because countries in europe that have these types of things, countries around the world and states th
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> i think we'll take it one step at a time. we'll sort of get over the marriage thing first, then look at kids but obviously we want a family so we have to start thinking about that. >> prince william and the then kate middleton before their wedding talking about their plans to start a family one day. well, that day has apparently arrived. katie nicholl is the author of "william and harry behind the palace walls "and is here to talk about today's breaking royal baby news. >> it's finally happened. the truth is ever since you and i were there on that wedding day reporting from buckingham palace, everyone has been on royal baby bump watch, and every time the duchess of cambridge has stepped out perhaps looking a little fuller in the face, a little rounder on her tummy, that rumor mill has just gone into overdrive. is she pregnant. well, yes, today we can reveal and confirm that she is indeed pregnant, which is wonderful and very joyful news, both herself, prince william an
... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. try running four.ningse. a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] zeebox is the free app that makes tv even better. if your tv were a space captain, zeebox would be an alien, first officer. just like an officer helps a captain explore the universe, zeebox helps you discover what shows are most popular, where the biggest buzz is, or what the stars are watching now. download zeebox free, and let your tv go where it's never gone before. >>> if you believe the housing recovery is here to stay, take a look at lumber liquidators, ll for you home gamers. we're big fans of housing related here on "mad money." it's a major retailer of hardwood floors. the kind of thing you buy to spruce up your home or build a new one.
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> time for some q & a. just over three weeks to make a deal and lawmakers in washington continue to push america's economy toward a fiscal cliff. both sides promising to cut trillions in government spending over the next decade but republicans insist it could be done without raising taxes on the rich. president obama ib cysts it's a nonstarter. it's a mess. no one can argue that. what happens if there is no deal? are we, as some argue, making too much of the fiscal cliff deadline? would it be a catastrophe to hit it, go over it? maybe for a while. joining me from london, the host of quest means business on cnn international. i have 60 seconds to set you straight on this. i'll go first. [ bell ringing ] all right. it could be catastrophic if congress doesn't get a deal by january 1. the government will try to soften the blow of spending cuts and tax increases. they could delay the withholdings that people pay though tax rates are going up or they cou
chief science correspondence robert bazel has the story. >> reporter: with the season starting early, children's hospital in memphis is feeling the first wave. >> we've seen more than 200 cases of flu in the hospital this week and we're admitting eight to ten kids a day. we expect it to accelerate, to get worse before it gets better in the next few weeks. >> reporter: schoolchildren are not only vulnerable, they play a big role in spreading the flu. >> when you have all those kids getting together, they tend to pass the virus back and forth, they all get sick in the school and bring it home into the community. >> the way to protect those people is to vaccinate the people around them. so vaccinating more children reduces the risk of older people in the community of getting the flu. >> reporter: health officials are urging everyone, adults and children over 6 months old, to get vaccinated, and officials emphasized there's plenty to go around and it's never too late to get it. for "today," robert bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next on "today," hear why one washington lawmakers wants
at a hearing entitled hgh testing in the nfl is science ready? hall of famer dick butkus and chief of the u.s. anti-doping agency will testify at 10 a.m. in the rayburn house office building. on thursday, december 13th, the house financial services committee holds a hearing on a portion of the dodd frank wall street reform act that requires banks to separate investment banging from their consumer services. -- banking from their consumer services. the hearing begins at 10 a.m. in the rayburn building. on friday, december 14th at the national press club president obama's former national security advisor general james jones will headline a panel looking at u.s. energy policy, national security and what lies ahead following the 2012 election. the session begins at 8:30 a.m. that's your capital rundown for the week of december 10th, 2012. you'll find us on www.myfoxdc.com and on twitter #capitalrundown. i'm tom fitzgerald.t week. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the ki
an impact on brain function. as science and medicine progressed, society has come to understand mental illness with clarity. senator conrad and crapo wanted to strike the word lunatic from the united states code. i thank them for their effort and i encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill to modernize or codified law to reflect the 21st century understanding of mental illness. and i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: this bill eliminates outdated references in the u.s. code that stigmatize individuals with mental illness. this legislation easily passed the senate with strong bipartisan support. the bill eliminates the word lunatic from the -- several sections of the united states code in order for our code to reflect meanings which are much more appropriate and up to date in the 21st century. in the past members of congress on both sides of the aisle have worked
upon restrictions not supported by sound science. so now i'm going to tell you about some problems i have with russia even though i want russia to be in the w.t.o. and i want this legislation to pass so it can be fully implemented. now i would say some things that we have problems. let's take pork exports as an example. in 2008, u.s. pork sales to russia totaled over 200,000 metric tons, and since that time, exports have fallen nearly 60% due to russia's reduced import quotas and questionable sanitary and phyto sanitary restrictions. i'm pleased our trade negotiators were able to negotiate a satisfactory trade rate quota for our pork, but this administration under president obama has fallen short in its obligation to stand up with u.s. farmers on these sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. in other words, using sound science instead of some i illegitimate reason for keeping our products out of russia. i have communicated time and again what i expected of this administration because they have to negotiate for us. in june 2011, i led a bipartisan letter with senators nelson and 26 oth
change between natural gas and coal is still somewhat a question mark. it looks based on most science we have now cleaner than coal, but we just don't know. we don't know a lot about the local impacts and how long these prices stay low or how long the wells last. there's a lot wi don't know about it, and it's moving so quickly. i think that's why you see a lot of of this. >> there's a lot of fear. >> and you're someone who is familiar with this. you live in upstate. you consulted for the oil and gas industry and you're a toxicologist, right? what are the fears you hear, and what's yue feeling about how people are understanding the process? >> people are not understanding the process at at all. the information is out there. the industry has been doing this for a while. they have the information, but the problem is a lot of people don't believe what the industry says. so even if the industry -- >> which is not ridiculous. let me just say it for the record, right? this is just as a basic kind of -- i think you're right. what ends up happening is you get this debate, right? the natural gas c
impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit, you showed what persistence to make sure your area was treated fairly. even though i must tell you many of us were not a joyful to hear your requests but never the less the outcome was great. you have set an example. our country has to be prepared to protect its supporters whether it is from the military or other kinds of encouragement or as the establishment of a program that says if you build and live here, that your route should not be taken away from you without the government helping to restore things. one of the questions i thought about when i heard you had this assignment is how much you had to do with this. it may take a long time to solve the problem. we commend you for your work. ad
of roseman university of health and sciences. in 1999 dr. rosenburg rented a small office space in henderson, nevada, believing he could establish a pharmacy school that would produce highly-skilled graduates ready to be recruited for work across the country. his innovative approach to education led him to develop a block format curriculum that emphasizes a student-centered active learning environment, allowing students to participate in experiencal education from the very beginning of their studies and complete their doctor al degree in just three years instead of the traditional four. making roseman one of the most affordable pharmacy schools in the nation. during his tenure, dr. rosenburg helped transform roseman of a local school of 38 students to a regional institution with over 1,000 and offering an array of quality programs in nursing, dentistry and business administration. mr. heck: as he prepared for retirement, i commend dr. rosenburg for his vision, innovation and commitment to offering students an affordable, state-of-the-art education that has and will benefit the state of nevad
to launch a rocket between december 10th and 22nd claiming for science and research. and new jersey governor chris chr tooe. the two showed a unified front in the wake of the storm. and the royal baby watch, it is on. there you see a pregnant and smiling catherine, duchess of cambridge. she was in for acute morning sickness. prince charles says he is thrilled he's going to become a grandfather. and the baby will be the next in line to the throne after prince william and actually after prince charles as well. so there's a little bit of a line there. >> rather it's a boy or girl. >> i think it's exciting. i don't think there's anybody out there they've been waiting and hoping and now we've seen she's pregnant and with child. >> catherine and no more kate. >> she's the duchess now. >> thank you. >>> one of the most conservative members of the united states senate, i think it's fair to say he shocked washington today, the tea party favorite senator jim demint of south carolina, he's standing by live. he's here in "the situation room." he's getting ready to explain why he's resigning from the sen
involved in science. i loved science as a kid. i tykes a couple different programs and items. this is their microscope. put iphone or microphone. it has so it interact. put a tablet. see on the large screen a butterfly or zoom on different specimens play up and down with a real lenz as they look through here. >> mom and dad you buy this it's $89 but you buy your kid an iphone and a tablet. >> if you have it most parents are throwing those things in there they have anyway. with you pick up on amazon dot many arthur wants this for his kid and i do. my kid is a huge thomas fan. all of these accessories that work with current tablet. thomas steam station. you put a tablet in the center here. here i have a larger ipad the game works by putting differential cards in the side of the thomas station. and it gets the kids up off -- i don't have the game running fully yet. because it made too much noise in here but the kids can get up off the couch and play different games and put percy and thomas cards in inside of it and it interacts with the tablet so the kids are involved and playin
from mars but in reality once we decide what we're going to do we have a science operational working group. we decide what we're going to do and the sol is a martian day. we write the script. we program -- we write the program. that takes about six hours to write. and then it gets sent from the deep space network to mars where the rover picks it up and the rover does all of those operations during that day. it gets that information first thing in the morning and then it is with us all day long. you program an entire day in one sitting. >> i love that name. did you say deep mars network? >> deep space. reporting live from the deep space network. so that's interesting. why do a whole day's worth of instructions at one time? is it more efficient form the machine? does it -- >> there's always this 20-minute light delay. in writing the program writing the scripts it's called, takes a little bit of time to do. we have to get together and review things. doing it in real time is inefficient. the way the rover wo
. caller: c-span could put on actual science. i think there is a lot of magical thinking on the part of democrats here. first of all, they are assuming if they raise the taxes on this one%, it will not affect the jobs and the companies that they work for. nor would it affect the customers they have. what are the percentages of the most important job creators around? how did you identify them? they had no clue. i think the other aspect of magical thinking is that in the noise and the signal, nate silver pointed out previously a 12% rise in gdp might ake for a 2% rise in employment. in 2005, we got 3.5 million jobs lost. it is a fantasy to believe that the president's spending is going to make employment rise more. recently, there has been an article by a harvard university law professor who says if you are going to do this thing, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raisi
is the telecommunications industry. one of the reasons as a computer science major i would argue, one of the reasons that the telecommunications, technology industry has been so successful, is because the government hasn't figured out how to regulate it and slow it down. yet here you have a proposal by the united nations coming out of the united nations to interfere with that multistakeholder organization that's been and allowed this industry to be so successful and allowed the internet to shape and dramatically improve so many people's lives. so many of the things that we can do today and all the conveniences that have been added through great new apps and technology have come from this multistakeholder governance of the internet. yet here you have the united nations trying to step in and let's be real clear about who some of these countries are that want to do this and what they are intending to do if they were to be successful. countries like russia and china are leading this. some of the arab nations right now, where you see uprisings, many of those uprisings have been brought through social med
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> chatting with you life at current.com/billpress. this is "the bill press show" live on your radio and current tv. >> bill: friday, december 7th here, the "full-court press" coming to you life from our nation's capitol and our studio on capitol hill brought to you today by the united steel workers and their great international president, leo gerard, north america's largest industrial union rep precepting 1.2 million active and retired members usw.org. big news this week uteout in the west, to colorado and washington. they had approved on november 6th each day, approving a measure for the full legalization of recreational use of marijuana. those laws have now kicked in. it is legal in washington and colorado to smoke pot. but will the if he did allow it? al ant saint pierre is the executive director of norml gets a lot of credit. allen, good to see you. >> good day, bill >> bill: i want you to know that last week, last time you were here, the question was raised about what the
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